Neuro-centered training in everyday life:
Balance and stability theme

   

 Louise Walther deals intensively with the topic of functional neurology and neuronal movement training. 

The sense of balance, also called the vestibular system, is an important part of the human body. It ensures that we control our posture and movements and orientate ourselves in space. The vestibular system works closely with other sensory organs, such as the eyes and brain, to form a complex network of information that enables us to move safely in our environment.

The sense of balance has a major impact on our body and our health. If the balance system is disturbed, various symptoms such as dizziness and nausea can occur. However, there are many ways to train and improve balance to reduce or avoid these symptoms.

Very personal: After both spinal disc surgeries, balance training was crucial for me in order to be able to walk properly again, to stand stable, to be able to move without restrictions and to regulate this extreme body tension. Since then, these exercises have been part of my everyday life. 

How is the balance maintained?

The sense of balance is a complex process based on the processing of sensory information through the vestibular system, sight and touch. The vestibular sensory cells in the inner ear, which are related to head movements and gravity, send signals to the brain. These signals are processed to provide information about body position and movement in space.

The brain uses this information to create an image of body position, which is then combined with information from other senses, such as sight and touch. This information allows the brain to control muscles and reflexes to adjust and stabilize posture and movements.

There are several reflexes involved in maintaining balance. Not only do they stabilize eye movements, but they also play a role in maintaining balance and posture.

If the vestibular system is disturbed, it can lead to dizziness or balance problems. However, through targeted training, the vestibular system and reflexes can be strengthened and improved to reduce or avoid symptoms.

What functions does the sense of balance affect?

The sense of balance is an important sensor that affects a variety of bodily functions. Here are some of the functions that the sense of balance regulates:

  1. maintaining posture: The sense of balance plays an important role in maintaining posture and stability during movement. The sensory information coming from the vestibular system helps the brain recognize the body's position in space and make appropriate muscle and reflex adjustments.
  2. movement coordination: The sense of balance is also important for the coordination of movements such as walking or running. By processing information about body position and movement in space, the brain can adjust muscles and reflexes accordingly to enable effective and coordinated movement.
  3. eye movements: The sense of balance is closely related to the control of eye movements. The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) stabilizes eye movements by moving the eyes at the same speed as the head to obtain a stable image on the retina.
  4. spatial orientation: The sensory information from the vestibular system, sight and touch help the brain to recognize the position of the body in space and to find its way in the environment.
  5. emotions: The sense of balance can also influence emotional reactions. Studies have shown that imbalances can lead to increased anxiety or depression.

What you can implement directly:

There are several things you can implement directly:

  • Adjust your head positions during exercises:
    • up
    • down
    • to the right 
    • to the left
    • to the top right
    • to the top left
    • down right
    • down left
  • Adjust your eye positions during exercises:
    • up
    • down
    • to the right 
    • to the left
    • to the top right
    • to the top left
    • down right
    • down left
  • Play with different step positions:
    • close stand
    • wide stand
    • step position

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